European conquest of America - Summary on a Map

Geo History
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Komentarze: 4 153

  1. Enzo Bueno
    Enzo Bueno
    Rok temu

    I really liked that the unknown territories were in black, it gives a better context.

    1. yahoog555 Yahoog
      yahoog555 Yahoog
      11 godzin temu

      @Frank James the existence of wheels... and many others... maps, boats, etc. They were isolated backward civilizations, totally 4th world XD

    2. David O'Neil
      David O'Neil
      19 godzin temu

      Like age of empires

    3. yahoog555 Yahoog
      yahoog555 Yahoog
      5 dni temu

      still is

    4. Manilal Basdeo
      Manilal Basdeo
      8 dni temu

      piuii⁸⁹

    5. Sol Mar
      Sol Mar
      11 dni temu

      @Patricio José Felipe Barahona GallardoEthiopia was already known in the Queen of Saba (King Solomon times) as mentioned in the Bible.

  2. davidgreenwitch
    davidgreenwitch
    5 miesięcy temu

    Fun fact. The city of New Amstetdam was defended by a big wall. But the British attacked from the sea. When they conquered the city and renamed it to New York, they also tore down the wall and reused the stones by building a street. That street got the name "Wall Street".

    1. Elam Reda
      Elam Reda
      9 godzin temu

      @Beo Wulf shouldn't New Amsterdam v2

    2. Andrés Falcone
      Andrés Falcone
      7 dni temu

      The street was already called Waalstraat by the Dutch before the wall was tore down.

    3. SUTTYMCFC
      SUTTYMCFC
      9 dni temu

      @anonstriker Following its capture, New Amsterdam's name was changed to New York, in honor of the Duke of York, who organized the mission. The colony of New Netherland was established by the Dutch West India Company in 1624 and grew to encompass all of present-day New York City and parts of Long Island, Connecticut and New Jersey.

    4. SUTTYMCFC
      SUTTYMCFC
      9 dni temu

      @The WÅB Following its capture, New Amsterdam's name was changed to New York, in honor of the Duke of York, who organized the mission. The colony of New Netherland was established by the Dutch West India Company in 1624 and grew to encompass all of present-day New York City and parts of Long Island, Connecticut and New Jersey.

    5. J Coker
      J Coker
      10 dni temu

      @Graggle5 Bigger economy than Russland which is the real pariah in Europe. Liberated E Europe in 45, then reliberated Cz 68, Hu 56, Pl 80, Chechnya 98, 14, and now Ukraine a brother Slav country that fought side by side against the Nazis. Stop pretending to be a Kiwi.

  3. Tannion
    Tannion
    6 miesięcy temu

    I just cannot fathom docking on a place like Florida without any prior knowledge of the land. That had to be such a unique human experience that may never be replicated. Like imagine living in 1500 Spain and seeing all of the trees and crocodiles and shit. That’s just so insane to me

    1. maydog06
      maydog06
      4 dni temu

      It'd be like landing on a different planet

    2. SoldoutJoe
      SoldoutJoe
      19 dni temu

      @HM Florida has alligators and crocodiles!!👍 😉 🐊

    3. World Comics Review
      World Comics Review
      19 dni temu

      Imagine your kingdom is in a war of succession, and people from a totally different culture, with advanced technology, just show up in the middle of it.

    4. World Comics Review
      World Comics Review
      19 dni temu

      Imagine your kingdom is in a war of succession, and people from a totally different culture, with advanced technology, just show up in the middle of it.

  4. vr
    vr
    11 miesięcy temu

    You also forgot to mention Spanish exploration of the whole west coast up to Alaska and the late conflict it became with the Russian until its cession. Also you missed the whole Spanish foundation of California. If you include Luisiana which was part of Spain barely a few years, more than half today’s United States was once Spanish.

    1. Anselmo
      Anselmo
      6 dni temu

      @Adele Sr Spain is the name wich Phoenicians gave to the Iberic Peninsula, three thousand years ago.

    2. Sebastián Almirón
      Sebastián Almirón
      6 dni temu

      @Adele Sr , the name of spain has existed for 3,500 years, that's how the phoenicians called it "i-spn-ya" in their language, 2,300 years ago the romans translated their name into latin and called it "hispania", hence the hispanics ". Later, "las españas" was used in the plural.

    3. Torian
      Torian
      19 dni temu

      @Adele Sr Here is an example of how ignorant an human being can be in the ERA OF INFORMATION. Where literally all it takes to learn about something is a quick research on your explorer.

    4. Yobo
      Yobo
      20 dni temu

      @Adele Sr so the spanish were so advanced that they called mexico the "NEW SPAIN" 350 years before the "OLD" Spain exists

    5. Adele Sr
      Adele Sr
      22 dni temu

      António Silva United States was once Spanish. Mentira Lie Being part of Castile like this is right. The name of Spain did not exist at that time. The name of Spain was born in 1876

  5. DeadEyeDave
    DeadEyeDave
    6 miesięcy temu

    This completely ignores the northward Spanish expansion along the west coast of North America beginning in 1542 with Cabrillo's expedition. That is a HUGE hole in the story. Vizcaino came along 70 years later. Most of the place-names in coastal California are from that second expedition.

    1. volbound1700
      volbound1700
      18 dni temu

      There was a lot missing but I think they wanted to do the highlights. A lot about the 13 colonies, France expansion, and early Spanish expeditions were missing.

  6. Thomas R
    Thomas R
    Rok temu

    This was so amazing. I learned about all of these expeditions in Latin American Studies courses, but to see the real-time progress map was really interesting.

  7. gwho
    gwho
    Miesiąc temu

    6:30 they didn't join the spanish just because they were impressed with guns and horses. there were preexisting rivalries and they saw the spanish as potential new allies against their enemies. it's also much eaiser to recruit disgrunted and oppressed (actually oppressed, not woke version of oppressed) people against the existing power.

  8. Luis The Film Hack
    Luis The Film Hack
    7 miesięcy temu

    At 7:06 there's a mistake. Cortes allied with the adversaries of the Aztecs long before the siege of Tenochtitlan.

    1. Damian Höster
      Damian Höster
      Miesiąc temu

      true

  9. Tukemuth
    Tukemuth
    4 dni temu

    It was so exciting when much of the world was completely unknown. Imagine setting out to explore the unknown and having no idea what you might find...

  10. Average Alien
    Average Alien
    Rok temu

    Imagine living in a time where there were unknown lands on earth. Would've been epic

    1. FreedomWarrior
      FreedomWarrior
      3 dni temu

      Better yet, imagine living in a time where there are an whole Universe full of galaxies, stars and planets to explore.

    2. Yung Choppa
      Yung Choppa
      10 dni temu

      @Abyss Strider I mean we are pretty far to know everything about this planet that we're livin' on

    3. Yung Choppa
      Yung Choppa
      10 dni temu

      @Bertholdt facts and if live exists here is cause it had to come from somewhere else. And now we know that there's forms of live that survive in the space vacuum

    4. Stefan Tinjala
      Stefan Tinjala
      11 dni temu

      @Bertholdt theres no thrill in landing on a fully mapped planet

  11. Joseph Ontime
    Joseph Ontime
    25 dni temu

    Spain's hegemony over the Pacific Ocean was so great that it was called the Spanish Lake.

  12. Ángel Gómez
    Ángel Gómez
    7 miesięcy temu

    Also, when Columbus brought some natives back, the Catholic Queen Isabel ordered him to release them

  13. Matheus Marc
    Matheus Marc
    15 dni temu

    Muito bom vídeo. Quando era novo mas aulas de história sempre imaginava o que mais estaria acontecendo no mundo ao mesmo tempo. 20 anos depois esse vídeo me respondeu. Obrigado PLpost.

  14. JJavier FALA.
    JJavier FALA.
    Miesiąc temu

    When Cortes was expulsed and drived away from Tenochtitlan, he and his 500 men were chased by the aztecs. Heading northeast, they allied with 1000 tlaxcalan warriors, but then they were catches up by the huge aztec army. Althoug it is not clear, it is estimated this army was around 10000 men. By using tercio defensive tactics, eficent and unknown by their enemies, the spanish and their tlaxcala allies resistes as they could, but they were too much outnunmered. Then, Cortes took the horses and with 50 men charged to the aztec general, the son (or nephew) of Moctezuma, who unwisely already was celebrating victory. This charge was so succesfull, that passed through aztec lines with easy (aztecs werent used to resist chavalry charges and their spears werent made to fight horses, obviously) and got to the general guards. Killing their leader and watching the tremendous charge, aztec army started reatriting caoticly. And that is how the first battle of the conquest of Mexica occured and was won by spaniards.

    1. ijemand
      ijemand
      29 dni temu

      driven*

  15. Hagen.
    Hagen.
    Rok temu

    Second Anglo-Dutch war actually turned to the advantage of the Dutch. The exchange of New Amsterdam for Suriname was seen as a win for the Dutch, not a loss. It's modern day revisionism to consider US soil more valuable, since no tropical goods could be extracted.

    1. Jan Visser
      Jan Visser
      6 miesięcy temu

      @Dr. Breadstick most people are not great at history, not even their own. It's a shame, it's not just interesting, there is also a lot to learn from it. I always asks my fellow Dutchmen were the wealth of our country comes from. They never know, they always think of colonialism or the far east spice trade.

    2. Dr. Breadstick
      Dr. Breadstick
      6 miesięcy temu

      Adding to this, this revisionism is even seen among the Dutch today who consider it a loss because 'they lost the US'. This is also weird because next to the fact that we don't know how this alternative history would've unfolded, the British lost these territories in 1776 while the Dutch hold on to Suriname up until the 70's of last century. Know the real history people!

    3. Jan Visser
      Jan Visser
      6 miesięcy temu

      @Comenter Tairon It's not just biased. It's flat out wrong. Even the English themselves admit that they lost this war, the outcome of this war is not even contested. Not saying the English are humble or anything, they know they can always refer to the fourth Anglo-Dutch war, when they absolutely crushed the Dutch.

    4. Comenter Tairon
      Comenter Tairon
      6 miesięcy temu

      This video is biased by an english point of view

  16. Gustavo Roedel
    Gustavo Roedel
    25 dni temu

    Good video, but, like always, Portuguese and Brazilian history is put in the corner when explaining the history of Latin America and of the Americas. The map concerning Brazil is very wrong. There was no actual Portuguese colonization in the Americas until 1530, with the expedition of Martim Afonso de Souza, who also explored Parana and Paraguay rivers. From 1530 to 1555, Portugal only settled villages in a little part of the coast, which comprised the region between Pernambuco and Bahia (Salvador) and somewhere in São Vicente (shore of São Paulo). In 1555, because of French occupation in Rio de Janeiro (French Antarctica), Portugal sent an army to the region, expelled the French and kinda conected for the first time the colonial regions between Pernambuco and São Vicente (the map in the video gets it totally wrong: there was no previous Portuguese control of Rio, nor did the Portuguese had any inland control by then). During the Iberian Union, Portuguese America was heavily attacked by all Spanish enemies (that is, all European colonial powers: the English, the French and the Dutch). Salvador was sacked by all many times. In 1612-1615, France built Equatorial France in Maranhão, until then unoccupied by Portugal. The Portuguese sent a fleet to successfuly capture the city, and built in Belém Fortress in 1616, in what today is Pará. They used Belém to expel the French, Dutch and English from the mouth of the Amazon river, that had became home of many foreign fortresses and villages. The French were the boldest ones, expanding from Caiena, in French Guiana, to Amapá and Marajó Island. From Belém, Pedro Teixeira expeled the French from Amapá, creating the North Cape Capitany in 1638, and destroying all Dutch, English and French fortresses in the Amazon Basin (that's how French Guyana, Dutch Guyana (aka Suriname) and British Guyana came to be, they were expelled from the Amazon basin). The Dutch saw that Portugal strength was falling under the rule of the Spanish king, so they invaded Pernambuco and Salvador in 1624, also building Recife. While Portugal had to deal with invasions in the North, the poor colonists in São Paulo had started, since the last years of 1500's, to explore the outback of the country, looking for Indigenous peoples to enslave or any kind of resources with which they could make some money (herbs, rare woods, minerals). They sacked Jesuitic missions and got some control of their pioneer routes, kinda indirectly expanding Portugal's territory in the region. It was only after Portuguese Restoration in 1640, the expultion of the Dutch from Portuguese America by the Luso-Brazilians in the Guararapes Battles, in 1648, and the Peace Treaty between Portugal and Spain in the 1660's that Portugal really started to focusing on the New World: Portugal had lost all their Eastern colonies in India and Indonesia to the Dutch during their war or to Britain (Portugal bought England's alliance against the Dutch and the Spanish selling them India). In 1680, Portugal started a power fight against Spain regarding the control of the River Plate: Portugal built Colonia de Sacramento in the East Bank of the river, just in front of Buenos Aires. The plan was to get natural borders with Spanish America (from the Amazon Basin in the North to the Platine Basin in the South). Sacramento also could be a smuggling center in the region, getting the silver from the Spanish settlers in exchange of English products that were smuggled to Brazil beforehand in Rio or São Vicente. The fight for Sacramento would last more than 150 years, with many comes-and-goes. At the time of Sacramento's foundation (1680), however, Portugal became the ruler of the South Atlantic See, commanding both sides of the Atlantic with virtual monopoly of sugar-cane and slave trade. The occupation of the outback of Portuguese America was only consolidated, however, in the 18th century: the pioneers from São Paulo found out large amount of gold and diamonds inland (Minas Gerais, Goiás, Mato Grosso and Rondônia) Cattle growers also expanded their pasture areas following river's heads, going deep in the territory. And just after all these things the Treaty of Madrid of 1750 was settled, Portugal exchanging Sacramento in the East Bank of River Plane (Uruguay) and their share of Moluccas and Philippines in the East for the control of the Amazon Basin, the center part of South America and SSete Povos das Missões, in today's Rio Grande do Sul. Since the Spanish Jesuits didn't leave Sete Povos, and the new king of Portugal didn't want to give up Sacramento, the Treaty was nullified in 1761 by Treaty of El Pardo. Struggle ofr Sacramento kept going on for years, and as Portugal and the United Kingdom were allies, each British victory against France in North America also meant a victory of Portugal against Spain in Sacramento: Portugal kept Sacramento after the Seven Years War, but lost it after the Independence War of the United States. Fleeing from Napoleon, the Portuguese Crown went to Brazil in 1808 and occupied French Guyana as a payback and reoccupied for some years the East Bank of the River Plate. Portugal had to give France the French Guyana back after the Vienna Congress of 1814-1815. In 1816, Portugal occupied for the last time the East Bank and annexed it later on. Brazil got independent in 1822 with the East Bank annexed as Cisplatine Province. The East Bank issue would only be solved after the Cisplatine War, or War of Uruguayan Independence, between 1825-1828, when Brazil and Argentina reached a stalemate. The UK intervened to guarantee East Bank's independence as Uruguay, a buffer state in between the two largest political entities in South America.

  17. James Frost
    James Frost
    7 miesięcy temu

    Good job. I like the view of the areas known and unknown. The color code of the countries involved. Straight to the point narration. Well done, A++

  18. Rob Fraser
    Rob Fraser
    Rok temu

    Depicting Scotland as being a part of England in the latter half of the 17th century is inaccurate, we were independent until 1707 so should not have been red. This video also negates to mention Scotland's colonial attempts in America, simply calling them British at a time when there was not yet a Britain...

  19. josh mcdonald
    josh mcdonald
    Rok temu

    This shit goes so hard. I’d like to think I would’ve actually enjoyed history and geography if it were formatted like this when I was in school

    1. Marcus Rotkirch
      Marcus Rotkirch
      29 dni temu

      It very much comes down to the teacher. Thankfully I had a good one in high school, so I've been into history all my life. If you tell it well, it's better than almost any fiction.

    2. Esteban Ocho
      Esteban Ocho
      Miesiąc temu

      @kevinsb70 ok boomer

    3. DrNota
      DrNota
      Miesiąc temu

      @disco ikr his stuff makes my brain hurt like no way could anyone believe this

    4. JJRJ 85
      JJRJ 85
      Miesiąc temu

      in school, history was all about "memorize text, memorize text, memorize text", barely any maps and harsh exams

    5. Danny Boi
      Danny Boi
      4 miesięcy temu

      True, but it probably took at least a few days to make a 17 minute video. Extremely unlikely for students to only have 17 minute lessons every few days.

  20. Graham Asher
    Graham Asher
    Rok temu

    Very good indeed. A historical narrative done as it should be, telling the story as it happened without moralising, and illustrating it well by maps.

  21. Avery the Cuban-American
    Avery the Cuban-American
    24 dni temu

    "Portugal had a dream that they controlled the entire Indian Ocean, including the Spice Trade...and then that dream was real. And Spain realized that this is not India, but they pillaged it anyway!" "Damn", said England and France, "We gotta start pillaging some stuff!" "Then, the Dutch revolt, and all the hipsters move to Amsterdam." "Damn", said Amsterdam... "We gotta start pillaging some stuff!"

  22. Jophiz
    Jophiz
    11 miesięcy temu

    Dude this is so great. I’ve always loved history but seeing it in this format just makes everything so much better. Keep up the good work dude, this is really awesome stuff.

  23. italomoto
    italomoto
    6 miesięcy temu

    Man I feel like I spent my whole life learning all the little pieces of that and you just put them all together

  24. Daniel Martins
    Daniel Martins
    Rok temu

    Everyone at war over gold and land The Portuguese: damn, sugar cane tastes good

    1. MrNoide
      MrNoide
      23 dni temu

      @oscar alegre No… Imagine at least 10 more important Indian ports/coastal cities controlled by us. We lost some of them but in the times of this video, it had a lot of Indian colonies. The reason we would get so much gold from that is because of the fee that we had on them when they wanted to trade.

    2. oscar alegre
      oscar alegre
      23 dni temu

      @MrNoide Portugal only had Goa

    3. SickoMode
      SickoMode
      29 dni temu

      @Karthik -Sun true that

    4. Karthik -Sun
      Karthik -Sun
      29 dni temu

      Portuguese had looted India and killed and looted until they were outdone by the british.

    5. MrNoide
      MrNoide
      Miesiąc temu

      @SickoMode uh sure buddy, go tell that to a random history teacher that knows about portuguese history

  25. Fala
    Fala
    5 miesięcy temu

    I love the use of the black, unexplored areas of the map, kinda like it's in strategy games with the fog of War! It's interesting that the fog of war like its known in games is actually a real military theory (Clausewitz, 19th century), yet so many people connect it with games (which got the idea of it from the military theory as well).

  26. troglodyto
    troglodyto
    21 dzień temu

    this is absolutely incredible. one minor improvement would be around 11:23 to mention that "united provinces" refers to "the united provinces of the netherlands"

  27. Nate M
    Nate M
    11 miesięcy temu

    This is a really great visualization gives a lot of context into what must have been going through the minds of the people back then what they must have thought without knowing about what was actually out there

  28. Mr WFH
    Mr WFH
    7 miesięcy temu

    I am a 5th grade student. After watching this video, I got an A in history essay in my school and I realize how great our founding father was.

  29. DPhone
    DPhone
    Rok temu

    The original voice over has quite a bit of character. Iconic, even. This version is good and pro style, but more generic.

    1. DPhone
      DPhone
      4 miesięcy temu

      ​@Frost Subsequent videos with the new narrator are more dramatically voiced, in a good way.

    2. Frost
      Frost
      4 miesięcy temu

      @DPhone Plus, this narrator is on multiple channels at this point. Props to him, but it gets kind of annoying when you hear the same narrator throughout multiple channels. One of the main lackluster features, however, is his lack of intonation in his voice (devoid of any distinct emotions). The previous narrator made the flow of the narrating and the video combination pretty good.

    3. kemp10
      kemp10
      6 miesięcy temu

      @silly_monkey pooooohh thank you sir

    4. kemp10
      kemp10
      6 miesięcy temu

      This is my first time seeing either. How do I find the original

  30. Nelson Soares
    Nelson Soares
    4 miesięcy temu

    After the Vikings it was the Portuguese who were first on the North American Eastern coast, 3 colonies were started in the North by the Portuguese (Newfoundland , Nova Scotia , Labrador ) and one more further south which we know today as the lost colony of Roanoke which was a venture done by Portuguese and the English , governor of this settlement was John White but better known to the Portuguese as Joao Branco which translates John White. My guess after so many years of investigating this colony and what happened to it comes down to this > they were attacked and killed not by the local Indians like some would like us to believe but by either the Spanish , French , Italians or a mix of the three you might even include the Dutch , all are suspects as far as I can tell. By the way Columbus was and still is a son of Portugal , just another lie told in our schools that he was Italian or even Spanish.... We must give Credit and Respect to Portugal and its sons of Discovery & exploration which advanced the world so many years faster than it would have taken otherwise , where would the world & humanity be now if not for their bravery and inventions and maps ? well about 100+ years at least behind where we are now.

  31. alfonso garcia
    alfonso garcia
    Miesiąc temu

    Although the map shows a great extend of control territory in reality the demographic of each of them varied enormously, for example there were around 50,000 Spaniards in Florida and way less in other parts .

  32. parsinpar
    parsinpar
    6 miesięcy temu

    Great video! Just an observation, the map is missing Alonso de Ojeda's expedition and founding of Santa Cruz at Honda Bay (current day La Guajira, Venezuela) in 1502. It was the first colony in mainland America.

  33. Rodríguez
    Rodríguez
    5 miesięcy temu

    13:27 Some inaccuracies in your maps - FYI: Coastal Nicaragua never officially became an English territory, and Belize aka British Honduras, was not formally recognized as a British territorial possession until July 8th, 1893, when Mexico along with the UK established territorial limits. It is well known that during the times of Imperial Spain, despite constant English piracy presence in that area of what today is Belize, the Spanish Crown, through its Viceroy in the New Spain (Mexico), built the Fort of San Felipe de Bacalar, which deterred English pirates settlements. The Fort is a phenomenal architectural military prowess built in 1725, and still can be visited.

    1. Chris Watson
      Chris Watson
      27 dni temu

      @Rodríguez So what's the difference? With regards your example of Basque fishermen. a) it's perfectly reasonable if you wish to describe the st lawrence river as de facto spanish, as it is reasonable not to. There is no one right answer. I have responded to you claiming that the video was wrong. It's not, it's one reasonable presentation out of many b) what you describe as de facto or not doesn't come into it. The video hasn't been set up for your world view c) de facto "ownership" of a piece of land usually requires i) actually being on the land, not in the water ii) using the land for a commercial purpose iii) having a set of rules that governs the use of that land. The st lawrence river example doesn't have any of those examples, the honduras example does. In honduras settlers used English law, not Spanish law. d) Spain didn't really even exist in 1534. It was essentially still a personal union of crowns. Spain is usually considered to have started to exist at the start of the union for the sake of convenience (there being no other suitable start point). 15th C Basque fishermen would not have considered themselves to be Spanish, or under Spanish law e) the St Lawrence river was considered to be Spanish by Spain after the Treaty of Tordesillas in 1494.

    2. Rodríguez
      Rodríguez
      27 dni temu

      @Chris Watson No, it isn't identical. For that matter, Spanish Basque fishermen were already fishing in the St. Lawrence river before Jacques Cartier "discovered" it in 1534 in present-day Quebec, Canada; but I don't say it "became de facto Spanish by the mid 16th C.

    3. Chris Watson
      Chris Watson
      28 dni temu

      @Rodríguez No 1786 is not mid 18thC. British settlers had been logging there since 1710, and largely left alone to their own devices by the Spanish. What you have posted is identical to what I posted.

    4. Rodríguez
      Rodríguez
      28 dni temu

      @Chris Watson1786 is definitely not mid 18th C. Even "BRITANNICA" - An English biased source, clearly states: "British buccaneers (pirates) and logwood cutters (more pirates) settled on the inhospitable coast in the mid-17th century. Spain regarded the British as interlopers (pirates) in their territory. By treaties signed in 1763 and 1783, Spain granted British subjects (pirates) the privilege (a bone) of exploiting logwood and, after 1786, the more valuable mahogany (another bone), though only within specified and poorly surveyed territories. Indeed, SPAIN RETAINED SOVEREIGNTY over the area, which Britain called a settlement (piracy in action), as distinct from a formal colony". Then it goes on: "Belize became the British colony of British Honduras in 1862-which was ruled by a governor who was subordinate to the governor of Jamaica-and a crown colony in 1871, when the Legislative Assembly was abolished'. Long story short, by the time your "Royal Piracy of Britain" finally put her act together and formally established a shitty colonial government on the coast of what today is Belize, all Hispanic America had become independent from Imperial Spain (circa 1810), whatever happened next in the 1800s, is as phony as your previous comment on "de facto" British settlement in the mid 18th C. "Source" : www.britannica.com/place/Belize/Early-history

    5. Chris Watson
      Chris Watson
      28 dni temu

      The coast that is now Belize became de facto British by the mid 18th C. Britain formally appointed governorship in 1786. It was formally declared a colony in 1862. Spain and Mexico disputed much of this, but not all. The Mariscal-Spencer Treaty in 1897 ended all territorial disputes between UK and Mexico over the area.

  34. athomicritics
    athomicritics
    Rok temu

    Spain really took a gamble with that meridian treaty when you think about it , they didnt knew how the continent shape was yet they decided the divide , they really could have ended up having the short stick

    1. x_toxicity
      x_toxicity
      11 dni temu

      @Sol Mar that’s literally not what I was talking about. But good for you

    2. Sol Mar
      Sol Mar
      11 dni temu

      @x_toxicity Spain won, it not only became the major world power of that time but also it won from a cultural point of view. In fact, today Spanish is the second spoken language in the world (after chinese), it is the second language in the USA and other countries. There's only one Portuguese-speaking country that belongs to the G-20 (Brazil) while there are 2 Spanish-speaking countries (Argentina and Mexico) that belong to it.

    3. JamazVu
      JamazVu
      15 dni temu

      @Matheus Marc ofc and to the east(atlantic coast) there was nothing compared to the Inca Empire, nothing but tribes

    4. Matheus Marc
      Matheus Marc
      15 dni temu

      @JamazVu Inca empire was on West side of South America bro. 7:50 or google it.

    5. Joel Lopes
      Joel Lopes
      19 dni temu

      @Rui Correia hahaah rui, nao digas disparates por favor.

  35. Leonel Toroc
    Leonel Toroc
    7 miesięcy temu

    At the same time, to the south of the continent, Shoujo Sukumi, who is also trying to reach the warcraft Indies to the west, passes through a strait that will one day bear his name and enters a new ocean that is unknown to him.

  36. Jipoze230291
    Jipoze230291
    6 miesięcy temu

    Absolutely fantastic video , so coherent . Thank you for this .

  37. ALEJANDRO DAVID BOLANOS
    ALEJANDRO DAVID BOLANOS
    6 miesięcy temu

    Masterpiece of information that clarifies not only the context in time and area of the known world, but also the context to understand the way of thinking of the actual powers of the World and their explanations.

  38. Luis The Film Hack
    Luis The Film Hack
    7 miesięcy temu

    At 5:14 there's a spelling mistake. The name of eastern most of the four islands is spelled Puerto Rico not Porto Rico.

  39. JC S
    JC S
    Rok temu

    It's good that finally someone pays attention to the attempts by the Spanish kings to make all people in America equal (as the video says, not everybody liked or followed that, but that was the idea). However, the map does not show all of the Spanish territories in Europe.

    1. SUTTYMCFC
      SUTTYMCFC
      9 dni temu

      @Cannabico British attacks on Spanish possessions in Central America resulted in high casualties, primarily from disease not in battle. 🤷🏻 Also Britain won the majority of those battles in that war. Spain was a super power too. And at least Britain has won wars by itself! How many wars have America won by itself..🤔... None! I seem to remember a few embarrassing battles in the war of independence by the Americas ( and you had France, Spain and dutch by your side) An American has no reason to laugh. 😂😂

    2. SUTTYMCFC
      SUTTYMCFC
      9 dni temu

      @P P British* come on America, it isn't that dam difficult to understand!

    3. oscar alegre
      oscar alegre
      23 dni temu

      @AppleSauce black people from America should know that and stop blaming white people for their past

    4. AmonkNeu
      AmonkNeu
      Miesiąc temu

      @Robert Martin Disculpa , ¿ que es eso que has escrito ? ¿ de donde sacas que los Españoles son los responsables al 100% del trafico de esclavos ? , ES MENTIRA ! . De hecho África la controlaban Portugal , Inglaterra , Francia e incluso Bélgica y Alemania , España solo tenia la pequeña Guinea . ¿ de donde venían los esclavos ? . Ya que no tienes dos dedos de frente al menos culturízate un poco por favor .

    5. Kevin Domingo Lorza
      Kevin Domingo Lorza
      2 miesięcy temu

      @Robert Martin That's very far from being true. Please, check out the numbers and you'll find that Spain was by far the power that least resorted to that shameful practice, specially if we take in consideration the amount of territory they controlled.

  40. rfvtgbzhn
    rfvtgbzhn
    5 miesięcy temu

    6:21 it was not just imperssion by firearms and horses. These peoples were actually enemies of the Aztecs and saw their chance to win a war against them in an Alliance with the Spaniards.

    1. Damian Höster
      Damian Höster
      Miesiąc temu

      correct

  41. Philosophy With Lilly
    Philosophy With Lilly
    7 miesięcy temu

    Your content is incredible. Thank you so much for your work!

  42. luso brasileiro
    luso brasileiro
    9 miesięcy temu

    amazing how a country as small as Portugal managed to be one of the pioneers in the discovery of new lands beyond europe, proud to have the sanhue of this brave people of the Atlantic.

    1. azov78
      azov78
      22 dni temu

      Netherlands founded most new land.. Half Asia, New Zeeland, Australia etc etc

    2. Pedro Lourenço
      Pedro Lourenço
      Miesiąc temu

      @Wild Heart 😂😂😂😂 this is so true. Checkmate @Jesus Bermudez

    3. Jesus Bermudez
      Jesus Bermudez
      5 miesięcy temu

      @Wild Heart And I say, I am right

    4. Wild Heart
      Wild Heart
      5 miesięcy temu

      @Jesus Bermudez The Padeira de Aljubarrota said you are rong!😂😂

  43. Teddy Mullaney
    Teddy Mullaney
    5 miesięcy temu

    Nicely done. Concise and simple enough for an introduction to the unversed.

  44. Mike U
    Mike U
    Rok temu

    This is awesome. The fog of war gives it the feel and mystery of Civilization (the game). I learned so much and this helps to explain why and how the European countries took over America. This is crack for a history nerd.

    1. Beaar
      Beaar
      Miesiąc temu

      it mustve been incredible exploring a new continent and hearing that there are multiple huge empires already inhabiting it

    2. Dean Phillips
      Dean Phillips
      Miesiąc temu

      @1mTh30n3 amazing game I've got over 1k hours in it. Love playing as a either England,Spain or Holland :)

    3. 1mTh30n3
      1mTh30n3
      6 miesięcy temu

      @RenaissanceYann true, EU IV is on a level of its own, the best of its kind!

    4. RenaissanceYann
      RenaissanceYann
      6 miesięcy temu

      Europa Universalis is next level compared to Civ. Try that or CK 2 and/or 3

  45. xGoodOldSmurfehx
    xGoodOldSmurfehx
    Rok temu

    im legitimately impressed, so few people actually know stuff about the colonization era, especially the history of New France i know very well how this type of quality of content requires an absurd about of knowledge and research amazing work :D altho i must say one thing for those interested, New France's story is extremely complicated, extremely deep and rich and the video did not even begin to scratch it

  46. Wojciech P
    Wojciech P
    24 dni temu

    I think its pretty cool that they set the map to unexplored instead of all visible. The game is much more interesting this way and it really set the tone for everything since.

  47. Al B Damned
    Al B Damned
    4 miesięcy temu

    So an honest question, when the boats are sailing and revealing Space, is that really how far you can see of the planet? I’m trying to reference this with the Chesapeake bay, it is pretty wide but much smaller on a map like this.

  48. Alastair Battson
    Alastair Battson
    11 miesięcy temu

    Awesome. I learned a lot in 18 mins and it was a great visualization. Thanks

  49. José Luis Fernández
    José Luis Fernández
    Rok temu

    Spain reached Alaska in 1791, at that moment Spain ruled the whole Pacific coast of America, from cape of Horn in south Chile to Alaska cities like Valdez or Cordova

    1. Irving Samson Smith de Anda
      Irving Samson Smith de Anda
      8 dni temu

      @Ramkhamhaeng the Great you have no a idea about physical anthropology, bioarcheology, palynology, ethnohistory, archeology, etc. We have full evidence about massive human sacrifices done by mexicas (what people wrongly call aztecs). And your notion of barbarism done by spanish conquerors has no episthemological basis.

    2. Irving Samson Smith de Anda
      Irving Samson Smith de Anda
      8 dni temu

      @José Luis Fernández bien dicho.

    3. Irving Samson Smith de Anda
      Irving Samson Smith de Anda
      8 dni temu

      @Weasel seriously, around 600 million speakers worldwide use spanish, in America are more than 450 million. Just the USA has more than 40 million spanish speakers. Third communication language worldwide, after, english and french, and second based upon native speakers.

  50. Jeremy
    Jeremy
    6 miesięcy temu

    Pretty amazing how you can learn more from a 17 minute youtube videao than you did in multiple years of world civ. during K-12 - nice work.

  51. Mateus girotto
    Mateus girotto
    10 miesięcy temu

    3:50 you are actually wrong, all the documentation that we have today shows that Portugal knew about the brazilian territory and did not went there by a mistake, you can read the letter of Caminha wrote to the Portuguese king when they arrive in porto seguro he wrote about the land that they knew were in their side of the Tordesilhas deal. For many year in Brazil was told in the way that you said, but after researchers finds the letter of Caminha and many other documents it was Cleary that wasn't a mistake. Many people wrote that was a mistake because they want to show the discovery of Brazil as the day wich the Portuguese were safe after a bad expedition to justify the fact that the Portuguese took so long to colonize Brazil. It's a very common mistake, even in Brazil many people still believes in the old theory

  52. LUSO
    LUSO
    10 miesięcy temu

    Hi 👋🏼 nice video But let me help you with a few unknown facts to you. Before the *Tordesilhas treaty* There was other treaty, The *Alcobaça treaty* soo the lands Colombo “discovery” by that treaty belong to Portugal Also almost 20 years before *Colombo* reached the Americas, already *João Vaz Corte Real* was in Greenland 🇬🇱 and Terra Nova (Canada🇨🇦) Brasil 🇧🇷 Before *Pedro Álvares Cabral* reached Brasil already *Yáñez Pinzón* as been there 3 months before… And 2 years before the Spaniard, *Duarte Pacheco Pereira* already was there! 13:18 The Dutch are expelled by a coalition of indigenes people, Portuguese and Afros former slaves. Cheers ✌🏼

  53. HenryManson
    HenryManson
    Rok temu

    Very nice Visualisation of the Exploration of the World! One of the best History Lessons on PLpost!

  54. blockmasterscott
    blockmasterscott
    11 miesięcy temu

    I really like how you presented this, well done.

  55. iAmHereitsOkay
    iAmHereitsOkay
    5 miesięcy temu

    One of the least biased, most matter-of-fact telling of history I’ve seen. Thank you.

  56. FlorinSutu
    FlorinSutu
    19 dni temu

    The French claim that a French explorer reached the shore of what is today named as "Brazil", a few years before Columbus reached the Carib Sea. Accordingly, the French also built a little a colony there.

  57. Moy Mo
    Moy Mo
    5 miesięcy temu

    I love the blacked out unknown and how when you mention England you show it’s historical borders and later turn it into GB from the union. Not many videos know the difference between GB UK and England

  58. Justin Sander
    Justin Sander
    21 dzień temu

    Not the first or the last conquest in history, even down to a tribal level every people on this planet at some point conquested another with very limited exceptions. Even among US native American tribes who regularly fought over territory like every other group of people in history. Its one of those things that in history was either good or bad depending on which side of the march you were on and if that group was an ally or not. In this case we are still relatively close to the period in which the conquest happened. And, have as a general direction as a nation Stopped warring with neighboring entities to gain territory as we at least try to take a more moral path. It would also be interesting to note that globally the nations of the world have changed several times since the first settlers arrived in the Americas. Look at what was once Persia, then you can go to Napoleon, and even the British who gallivanted the 7 seas like pirates claiming everything that wasn't tied down or strong enough to defend its self. The best of all has to be the back and forth between Japan, China, and Korea with some nearly unbelievable events that wouldn't be out of place in a fantasy novel or action movie. Fleets downed multiple times by sudden storms. Armies, figures of resistance, mob rule, and even a time when every small state in Japan its self was in conflict with at least one other. Its hard to see how we are like any other animal but when you look at the history of man you see that its been as any other natural struggle which is always morally ambiguous and necessary for the persistent growth of the species.

    1. Tim Kirwin
      Tim Kirwin
      18 dni temu

      It gets so personal, so tribal to so many. But that was a beautiful, sober overview of world struggles. We are all, after all, people. Vicious and merciful. Powerful and meek. We are all just people.

  59. Steve Dietrich
    Steve Dietrich
    7 miesięcy temu

    So good. I wish we could have had this back in junior high.

  60. Good Life Greenscapes Breckenridge
    Good Life Greenscapes Breckenridge
    7 miesięcy temu

    Phenomenal depiction of mapping the unknown.

  61. Kevin McCabe
    Kevin McCabe
    11 miesięcy temu

    Very well done video, thank you!

  62. Frostern
    Frostern
    Rok temu

    Even though Rahul has dropped voicing these videos, (and personally I think his voice is so calming to listen to) the content of these videos still remain top notch as they did before, and hey let’s welcome Matthew as a positive change. And as Rahul himself stated, we’ll get used to the new voice soon. Stay strong Rahul, and welcome Matthew

    1. Hazmat Squad
      Hazmat Squad
      4 miesięcy temu

      @Mobile hub Not really. I’m British and I’ve never heard anyone say XX.

    2. Mobile hub
      Mobile hub
      6 miesięcy temu

      @Kari BrimacombeXX We say XX as its the British version of lol

    3. Kari Brimacombe
      Kari Brimacombe
      8 miesięcy temu

      He sounds like he'd be in one of those weird top ten monsters caught on camera videos

  63. D.
    D.
    29 dni temu

    So if the Brits would not win the 7-year war and sign that treaty in 1763, almost the entire North America would be a french country called New France? That is very strange to think about.

  64. flankerpraha
    flankerpraha
    6 miesięcy temu

    It should be said that those actually were Fyodorov and Gvozdev who properly mapped the "Bering Strait" in 1730s, not Bering himself (who in fact did bnot discover the strait, it was Dezhnov 80 years before him).

  65. Wanna Bee
    Wanna Bee
    5 miesięcy temu

    Notes to ponder: "As many as 40 sites scattered across the Southwest contain human bones that show distinctive evidence of having been butchered and cooked--signs consistent with cannibalism" - L.A. Times. Also ..." many of the pre-existing local African slave systems began supplying captives for slave markets outside Africa..." - Wikipedia. Wow, the undiscovered lands seemed pretty evil to their own people, I think they don't teach this in schools.

  66. Rodríguez
    Rodríguez
    5 miesięcy temu

    16:03 multiple expeditions were sent from the Viceroyalty of New Spain to explore, halt and defend Spanish territorial claims in the pacific northwest. Some of the most relevant expeditions are the ones led by Malaspina, Bodega y Quadra, and Juan Pérez, that explored the Nootka territory in the Canadian province of British Columbia some years before Capt. James Hook. These expeditions halted the Russian advancement in the region, and permitted Imperial Spain to reaffirm its sovereignty in the Nootka territory. For this same reason, Spanish names such as Váldez, Juan de Fuca, Haro, Alberni, Córdova, López, Galiano, Quadra, etc. are visible on the maps and navigation charts of Alaska and B.C.

  67. halleck3
    halleck3
    24 dni temu

    Very concise! And the maps really help one visualize it.

  68. Andrew Layton
    Andrew Layton
    7 miesięcy temu

    Smallpox, with a fatality rate of about 1/3, does not decimate (literal meaning - to reduce by 1/10); it devastates.

    1. Hyper Autismo
      Hyper Autismo
      6 miesięcy temu

      THANK YOU! I hate when people misuse it.

  69. Nicola Bragato
    Nicola Bragato
    22 dni temu

    Really nice grafic ! I appreciate how you uncover new territory

  70. Matthew Silva
    Matthew Silva
    24 dni temu

    Researching/writing about the Portuguese Bandeirantes..my ancestors were involved in emerald/gem mining. Great video, puts a lot of the timeline into perspective

  71. Rodrigo Bamondes
    Rodrigo Bamondes
    Rok temu

    Portugal financed an expedition in the Amazon River in 1563 that finished in Quito, in the 1800s a new expetion was done using the diaries information, and they were able to reach Quito again.

    1. JamazVu
      JamazVu
      23 dni temu

      I wonder how is that possible, because Quito is at 2.8km above sea level

    2. Gustavo Roedel
      Gustavo Roedel
      25 dni temu

      Like always, Portuguese and Brazilian history is put in the corner when explaining the history of Latin America and of the Americas. The map concerning Brazil is SO wrong. There was no actual Portuguese colonization in the Americas until 1530, with the expedition of Martim Afonso de Souza, who also explored Parana and Paraguay rivers. From 1530 to 1555, Portugal only settled villages in a little part of the coast, which comprised the region between Pernambuco and Bahia (Salvador) and somewhere in São Vicente (shore of São Paulo). In 1555, because of French occupation in Rio de Janeiro (French Antarctica), Portugal sent an army to the region, expelled the French and kinda conected for the first time the colonial regions between Pernambuco and São Vicente (the map in the video gets it totally wrong: there was no previous Portuguese control of Rio, nor did the Portuguese had any inland control by then). During the Iberian Union, Portuguese America was heavily attacked by all Spanish enemies (that is, all European colonial powers: the English, the French and the Dutch). Salvador was sacked by all many times. In 1612-1615, France built Equatorial France in Maranhão, until then unoccupied by Portugal. The Portuguese sent a fleet to successfuly capture the city, and built in Belém Fortress in 1616, in what today is Pará. They used Belém to expel the French, Dutch and English from the mouth of the Amazon river, that had became home of many foreign fortresses and villages. The French were the boldest ones, expanding from Caiena, in French Guiana, to Amapá and Marajó Island. From Belém, Pedro Teixeira expeled the French from Amapá, creating the North Cape Capitany in 1638, and destroying all Dutch, English and French fortresses in the Amazon Basin (that's how French Guyana, Dutch Guyana (aka Suriname) and British Guyana came to be, they were expelled from the Amazon basin). The Dutch saw that Portugal strength was falling under the rule of the Spanish king, so they invaded Pernambuco and Salvador in 1624, also building Recife. While Portugal had to deal with invasions in the North, the poor colonists in São Paulo had started, since the last years of 1500's, to explore the outback of the country, looking for Indigenous peoples to enslave or any kind of resources with which they could make some money (herbs, rare woods, minerals). They sacked Jesuitic missions and got some control of their pioneer routes, kinda indirectly expanding Portugal's territory in the region. It was only after Portuguese Restoration in 1640, the expultion of the Dutch from Portuguese America by the Luso-Brazilians in the Guararapes Battles, in 1648, and the Peace Treaty between Portugal and Spain in the 1660's that Portugal really started to focusing on the New World: Portugal had lost all their Eastern colonies in India and Indonesia to the Dutch during their war or to Britain (Portugal bought England's alliance against the Dutch and the Spanish selling them India). In 1680, Portugal started a power fight against Spain regarding the control of the River Plate: Portugal built Colonia de Sacramento in the East Bank of the river, just in front of Buenos Aires. The plan was to get natural borders with Spanish America (from the Amazon Basin in the North to the Platine Basin in the South). Sacramento also could be a smuggling center in the region, getting the silver from the Spanish settlers in exchange of English products that were smuggled to Brazil beforehand in Rio or São Vicente. The fight for Sacramento would last more than 150 years, with many comes-and-goes. At the time of Sacramento's foundation (1680), however, Portugal became the ruler of the South Atlantic See, commanding both sides of the Atlantic with virtual monopoly of sugar-cane and slave trade. The occupation of the outback of Portuguese America was only consolidated, however, in the 18th century: the pioneers from São Paulo found out large amount of gold and diamonds inland (Minas Gerais, Goiás, Mato Grosso and Rondônia) Cattle growers also expanded their pasture areas following river's heads, going deep in the territory. And just after all these things the Treaty of Madrid of 1750 was settled, Portugal exchanging Sacramento in the East Bank of River Plane (Uruguay) and their share of Moluccas and Philippines in the East for the control of the Amazon Basin, the center part of South America and SSete Povos das Missões, in today's Rio Grande do Sul. Since the Spanish Jesuits didn't leave Sete Povos, and the new king of Portugal didn't want to give up Sacramento, the Treaty was nullified in 1761 by Treaty of El Pardo. Struggle ofr Sacramento kept going on for years, and as Portugal and the United Kingdom were allies, each British victory against France in North America also meant a victory of Portugal against Spain in Sacramento: Portugal kept Sacramento after the Seven Years War, but lost it after the Independence War of the United States. Fleeing from Napoleon, the Portuguese Crown went to Brazil in 1808 and occupied French Guyana as a payback and reoccupied for some years the East Bank of the River Plate. Portugal had to give France the French Guyana back after the Vienna Congress of 1814-1815. In 1816, Portugal occupied for the last time the East Bank and annexed it later on. Brazil got independent in 1822 with the East Bank annexed as Cisplatine Province. The East Bank issue would only be solved after the Cisplatine War, or War of Uruguayan Independence, between 1825-1828, when Brazil and Argentina reached a stalemate. The UK intervened to guarantee East Bank's independence as Uruguay, a buffer state in between the two largest political entities in South America.

    3. João Henrique Lique
      João Henrique Lique
      Miesiąc temu

      @Igor D. Porto Actually was an italian. Genoa is not spanish and columbus was genoese.

    4. Lord Payo
      Lord Payo
      5 miesięcy temu

      @Lucas Gaiofatto They only arrive in the East of Terranova. They had problems with the native

    5. Lucas Gaiofatto
      Lucas Gaiofatto
      5 miesięcy temu

      @Lord Payo And the viking couldn't see a continent too ?

  72. veteran35th
    veteran35th
    5 miesięcy temu

    Excellent use of maps and graphics, bravo.

  73. D D
    D D
    3 miesięcy temu

    Very informative. Even detailed the fact that Mainland Nova Scotia (means New Scotilan by the way) remained in British hands while Cape Breton Island ( now apart of Nova Scotia ) remaining in French control. A major battle in 1758 saw the British conquer the French fortress of Louisbourg on Cape Breton Island - which spelled the beginning of the end of New France

  74. Diogo Salazar
    Diogo Salazar
    Miesiąc temu

    Good video but I wish you had focused a bit more on the Portuguese expansion and exploration. Could have at least named one city in Portuguese America (Brazil) on the map. So many cities founded in the early 1500s.

  75. Josh Mac
    Josh Mac
    Rok temu

    This might be extra but this video actually could’ve included a lot more information about the expeditions and colonies

  76. Polished Pebble
    Polished Pebble
    Rok temu

    Fog of War adds A LOT to the video. You get to see what european people at the time saw.

    1. MrCher2
      MrCher2
      Miesiąc temu

      Yes. And when we you review the maps they got at that time, you can see that they were very unreliable. Land positions were wrong, there were some invented lands, and lands were missing in supposedly explored areas. Some maps were more accurate than others, but you couldn't know which one was right.

    2. Cyrus
      Cyrus
      Rok temu

      @Petmop No shit.

    3. Petmop
      Petmop
      Rok temu

      @Cyrus that's a fact, I'm just saying they weren't accurate

    4. Cyrus
      Cyrus
      Rok temu

      @Petmop Maps didn't need to be perfect, captains aboard vessels wouldn't use the maps to navigate, rather latitudes and magnetic directions which obviously were accurate, otherwise there wouldn't be any return voyages.

    5. Petmop
      Petmop
      Rok temu

      @Gabriel Dnchf i think he meant in medieval times, people couldn't make accurate maps

  77. Jordy M. Mendoza
    Jordy M. Mendoza
    23 dni temu

    Amazing video that actually makes me a bit sad: too late to explore the world and too early to explore the universe.

  78. Rusty Gold
    Rusty Gold
    26 dni temu

    6:37 Go and read the Ferdinand Magellan circumnavigation expedition around the World. A truly magnificent considering it was the 1520's sailing West to East. Should be a movie made of it

    1. Diego De Juan
      Diego De Juan
      24 dni temu

      Indeed, although he could not finish the voyage (died in the Philipines). It was finished by Juan Sebastián Elcano, who is considered the first man to circumnavigate the world.

  79. Jeroen
    Jeroen
    22 dni temu

    I'm always wondering: What if Spain never discovered the Americas. So much ancient culture would survive. Their own languages would still be mainly spoken.

  80. Dorian Philotheates
    Dorian Philotheates
    22 dni temu

    Superbly presented - bravo! Greetings from Greece.